About Mosquitos

Mosquitos, like roaches, ticks and kissing bugs, are vectors, meaning they carry disease. Mosquito bites are so common in the spring and summer, that many of us forget about the dangers these pesky no-see-ums carry.

Not all mosquitos carry disease, although it is nearly impossible to detect which are carriers and which are harmless. Culex Tarsalis is a species that carries West Nile Virus and they have been spotted in Lubbock as recently as last summer.

For most of us, we know that the female mosquito feeds on human blood and that certain people are preferred. Men with a blood type of O, take caution, you’re the most likely group to be bit!

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Behavior

mosquito

Children are more at risk of mosquito bites, playing outside for long hours in the West Texas heat and they are more susceptible to the diseases some mosquitoes carry. Mosquitoes are most active at dusk and dawn, especially following a period of rain and wet weather.

Lubbock experienced record rainfall last year in spring and early summer, causing the mosquito population to spike. It’s unknown what kind of year we will have in 2016, but if it’s more wet weather, we have a recipe for more mosquitoes.

Properties with a swimming pool, sprinkler system, lake or pond are most at risk of mosquitoes breeding, resulting in a high local population when adults hatch, typically in spring and summer.

The Risk of Texas Mosquitoes

In West Texas, our proximity to Central and South America makes our mosquitoes more likely to carry disease. West Nile is still the most common mosquito borne illness and although it is carried by Lubbock mosquitoes, 70 – 80 percent of people infected with West Nile exhibit no symptoms. Only 1% of the population develops severe symptoms including high fever, tremors and coma.

In the summer of 2015, Texas Tech discovered Lubbock mosquitoes also carry St. Louis encephalitis, which is similar to West Nile. However, no human cases have been reported in the area to date.

Finally, the Zika virus has captured headlines in the last year. Several cases of a Zika Virus infection have occurred in Lubbock, but these were the result of sexual contact while abroad. At this time, mosquitoes in Lubbock aren’t transmitting the Zika virus, and the illness is being studied and tested further in 2016.

Identifying a Problem

Mosquito repellent has only one purpose, it repels mosquitoes off your body and doesn’t kill or stop the growth of populations. Most sprays and citronella candles don’t completely prevent bites, and companies will never guarantee a repellent will be 100% effective.

Lubbock County does pay for mosquito treatment, through Vector Control Services. However, the five-man crew is overwhelmed during mosquito season and doesn’t make house calls. Spraying is done mainly in the city and on publicly owned land. The City of Lubbock encourages residents to help combat mosquito populations by hiring a professional.

If you are experiencing a high number of mosquitoes in your backyard, ranch or commercial property, Bug Tech can cut down the population immediately and prevent an outbreak the following summer. Protect your family, livestock and neighbors with effective mosquito abatement from Bug Tech.

General Treatment

Mosquito eggs and larvae thrive in only a half inch of water, such as a horse trough, trash can, bird bath, swimming pool, lake, pond or creek. Identifying any exposed areas of water that can be moved indoors is the first step to preventing breeding and larvae. But often, we can’t control the breeding grounds of mosquitoes and treatment is needed.mosquito fogger

Mosquito treatments are very focused outdoors and on the yard. Bug Tech applies a chemical residual to the entire yard, both the front, side and back and pricing starts at $65. Our team also has experience spraying on large ranches and acreage is not an issue. We even have a truck mounted mosquito fogger.

The chemical compound we use is environmentally friendly and safe for humans and animals once the liquid residual has dried. We will avoid spraying coy and other fishing ponds, as the chemical can be ingested by both mosquito larvae and fish.

This chemical covers all areas that a mosquito would land, such as a blade of grass or on a bush. Once a mosquito comes in contact with the chemical even when dry, they will die.

Bug Tech recommends customers have mosquito treatment reapplied once every month in order to be most effective at preventing mating, egg laying and new larvae in the spring.